Capturing Transition

Posted by Bradley L. Garrett on Monday Feb 6, 2012 Under Academia, Archaeology, Cultural Geography, Film, Geography, Heritage, History, London, Research, Spatial Politics

“…for cities change — alas! — more quickly than a mortal’s heart.”
- Charles Baudelaire

Gentrification in process

In 2010, myself and five fellow PhD students at Royal Holloway, University of London wrote a research proposal in a pub. We were subsequently awarded a small grant from the 2012 olympic Creative Campus Initiative to make a 30-minute film about the relationship between the olympics, geography and water. The result was London’s Olympic Waterscape, a film about an East London area with a rich industrial history built around a series of braided waterways in the Lea Valley that is currently undergoing a complete landscape reconfiguration as part of the 2012 olympics. I wrote about that production of that film back in 2010 and if you haven’t seen it yet, it’s here:

A secondary goal on this project was to hold an exhibit at Royal Holloway during the Creative Campus Initiative garden party in 2010. The exhibit was a huge success and soon after we were contacted by the British Library asking if they could host our film on the Sports and Society page. Then, incredibly, we were contacted by The Archaeology Channel, asking if they could play it during their video news. The number of hits on the video quickly exceeded all expectations (relative to most academic work).

Vibrant matter

I think everyone on the team, at this point late in 2010, was stunned that the project had taken on such a life of it’s own. We were even more shocked when David Gilbert, the Head of Department at Royal Holloway (who initially alerted us to the competition), asked us if he could contribute departmental funds to help develop the research project into a school module with a lesson plan and DVDs. These were eventually sent out to 500 schools across the UK. Then, in one final chapter, we were invited to author an article about the project for the International Journal of Heritage Studies be be included in a special issue about the 2012 olympics which we have been working on for over a year now (yeah I know, academia is slow!). So, with all that said, I am proud to announce the release of London’s Olympic Waterscape: Capturing Transition by Michael Anton, myself, Alison Hess, Ellie Miles and terri moreau.

I wanted to relay the whole story of this project for two reasons. First, I want to encourage budding researchers to write proposals for projects like this when the opportunity arises. Yes, they are a pain and yes, you don’t really have the time, but often these things can spin off into all sorts of wonderful directions you can’t imagine. You also often get to meet a lot of great people who can teach you unexpected things and may one day become collaborators on other projects. Secondly, and perhaps more importantly, I want to continue to relay to the wider geography community the power of new media. The way this project took off was a result of our combined use of photography, video and text, mashed up in different ways, some of which we didn’t plan or intend. The end result can be a project imbued with far more gravitas than an article alone.

Future ruins

I would just like to end this post with a thank you to Alison Hess, Ellie Miles, Michael Anton and terri moreau for their wonderful collaboration (and friendship!) throughout this process. This was the most fun I’ve ever had working on a research project. I’d also like to thank Amy Cutler and Elisabeth Guthrie for their valuable contributions and Iain Sinclair, Toby Butler, Rob McCarthy, Nick Bateman, Nathalie Cohen, Alex Werner and William Raban for agreeing to be interviewed for the film. Thanks as well to David Gilbert, Tim Cresswell and Phil Crang at Royal Holloway for the support and, of course, to the London Creative Campus Initiative for the funding the work.

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London’s Olympic Waterscape Exhibit

Posted by Bradley L. Garrett on Monday Jun 7, 2010 Under Cultural Geography, Film, Uncategorized

Last night we put on an exhibit at Royal Holloway, University of London as part of the Creative Campus Initiative linked to the London 2012 Olympics. The exhibit, run by Alison Hess, Ellie Miles, terri moreau, Michael Anton, Amy Cutler and myself was a huge success with far more visitors than we ever could have anticipated! Thank you so much to everyone who came out and to the rest of the team for putting on an amazing show!

The exhibit was broken into 3 parts. In the first, we displayed 10 photographs from Mike Seaborne, a photographer at the Museum of London, depicting the Olympic Waterscapes prior to construction of the stadium site. Opposite these, we displayed a number of photographs from our own journeys (undertaken as a geographic triathlon) up, down and around these waterscapes documenting the changes taking place there.

Finally, we made a 20 minute film about the past, present and future of these olympic waterscapes which I am proud to present for the first time here!

Here are some pictures from the exhibit. All photographs are by Danny Pack.









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Please also visit the project website

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